Introduction

Astragalus is a plant that is commonly used in soups and tea. The roots have been used to ease symptoms of diabetes and to improve blood flow. Astragalus has also been used to help the body fight illness.

It can be taken as a pill, powder, or extract. It can also be injected into the bloodstream by a healthcare provider.

Dosages

3 to 7 grams once per day

What Research Shows

Likely Effective

  • Diabetic kidney disease—likely to improve symptoms when used with standard treatment E1, E2

May Be Effective

  • Cancer treatment support—may improve response to standard therapy B1
  • Chronic heart failure—may improve quality of life and ease symptoms when used with standard treatment C1-C3
  • Diabetes—may improve glucose control when used with standard treatment D1
  • Leucopenia—may improve treatment outcome G1
  • Stroke—may ease post stroke fatigue and improve quality of life I1
  • Viral myocarditis—may improve recovery when used with standard treatment J1, J2

May Not Be Effective

Not Enough Data to Assess

Editorial process and description of evidence categories can be found at EBSCO NAT Editorial Process.

Editorial process and description of evidence categories can be found at EBSCO NAT Editorial Process.

Safety Notes

It is likely safe to take astragalus in small doses for a short time. Not enough studies have been done to say whether it is safe to use for a long period. It is also not known whether it is safe to take by women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Interactions

Talk to your doctor about any supplements or therapy you would like to use. Astragalus can interfere with treatment or make conditions worse.

  • People with high blood pressure should talk to their doctor before taking astragalus. It may interact with blood pressure medicines.

Revision Information

  • Reviewer: EBSCO NAT Review Board Eric Hurwitz, DC
  • Review Date: 07/2019 -
  • Update Date: 09/09/2019 -